Pause and Smell

Originally posted on The Herb Lover's Garden:

There was a memorable moment in the triple digit heat soaked day of a recent visit to the Huntington Botanical Garden. The sun began to sink low in the sky, the garden was closed to the public. People were few,  but the insects and birds were vocal and lively.  In the waning heat of the day, a strong fragrant breeze drifted around.
The release of essential oils in the plants along the walkways became heady. Rosemary, santolina, thyme, catmint, yarrow, lavender and sages.
I love the smell of a garden in that moment just before complete darkness is all around.

Huntington evening setting The walkways in the California Gardens of the Huntington in San Marino. 

In the heat of the night
Why fragrance at night? The daytime warmth is still captured in the surface of the concrete walkways as the soil begins to cool down. This combination of temperature change intensifies aromatic plants…

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The season of two faces. The last gasp of summer heat, but a cooler feel in the night air.  Nature signals the changing seasons as colors flame and flowers fade.

As we cast our summer gardens aside, join me on my other blog Herb Lover’s Spa for ideas, inspiration and recipes for herbal harvests and how to use them.


Water Wisdom for the Garden

statue and spirea with name

Water, Water anywhere?
By Sue Goetz

As drought reveals itself in the Pacific Northwest, we watch our typical lush, green surroundings turn shades of tan. Just like the hot weather, watering the garden is a hot topic.
Here is what water-wise gardeners should know:
The obvious…plants need water.
The less obvious, how they get it and survive. Watering the leaves to cool off the plant probably feels like you are doing something good for the garden, but most of the time, little water gets down to the roots. Think of it like this: imagine you are thirsty and instead of taking a drink of water, you take a shower. You might feel cooler, but it does not satisfy the thirst. That is what it is like for plants; they need water in the soil and around their roots to allow the plant to get water to the stems, leaves and flowers.
How do you know if you’ve watered enough?
Hand check
It can surprising how much time it takes to get water to the needed depth of soil.
Water the garden as you normally do and wait about 10 minutes. Then check your garden’s soil moisture.Take the gloves off and push fingers into the ground around your plants in different areas of the garden. Dig in with a trowel too.
In an area with sufficient water, the soil should be thoroughly moist after each watering…all the way down to the root zone. The top 2 or 3 inches of the soil may be semi-dry, but the soil below that should be moist to a depth of 5 to 6 inches or more.
Get down deep
Established plants also need deep watering to keep roots far down into the soil. If they are given water only at the surface, they get lazy and don’t have to work hard for their water. In periods of drought, shallow-rooted plants can’t stay cooled by the soil, so they stress and wimp out. Hanging out with a hose spraying a garden bed or the lawn for 15 minutes just doesn’t do it. It might settle the dust for the day but does not get enough down into the root zone where plants need it. Instead of daily, light water, do a good weekly soaking that allows the soil to become wet to a depth of 6 inches. If your system of watering, either sprinkler or by hand does not do this, adjust to a once a week deep watering to ensure good subsoil moisture that is consistent. Just because it is hot, doesn’t mean you have to water every day. Container gardens are the exception! Plants in the ground need to get the available water from the soil before watering again. Deep water will help roots grow deep.
Maybe it’s your soil
Improving your soil’s moisture-holding capacity is as simple as mixing organic compost into your beds. Depending on the type of soil, more organic matter means more water is accessible to plants. Dense clay particles rob most of your soil’s moisture, decreasing the amount of water available to plants while sandy soils drain water too quickly for plants to absorb it. An amendment can help the soil structure of both clay and sandy soils for more efficient water holding.

Timing Matters
In warm weather, water in the morning to give plants a chance to drink up before the hot sun and the wind evaporates moisture. If you can’t water in the morning, try for late afternoon, but not too late. The foliage should have time to dry before the sun goes down to help protect plants that are prone to fungal diseases. Powdery mildew and spider mites love to thrive in warm weather AND moisture.
Mulching Matters
Mulch reduces water evaporation by helping to trap moisture on the ground during dry times of the year. Use a good organic compost to help nourish the soil in planting beds. Spread up to 4 inches deep all over landscape beds. Do not pile mulch near the base of plants, keep it shallow to avoid rot. In established planting beds topped with bark, occasionally rake the old mulch to break up the soil surface. A good raking (not scraping) to fluff the surface of the soil will help water penetrate through.
Brown lawns are okay.
By the way if you have joined the ranks of the brown lawn brigade, all is well. The heat and lack of moisture have pushed it into dormancy and as soon as natural rainfall returns it will bounce back with vigor. Just don’t allow heavy foot traffic or the dog to tear it up too much. In the spring as it actively begins to grow again, pay extra attention to keeping it healthy.

Basil for a Manly Herbal

Originally posted on The Herb Lover's Garden:

Basil, it’s not just for pasta! Not too perfumy, floral or girly, basil is the perfect herb to use in skin care blends for men.

basil polaroid herb lovers

Basil nurtures skin with essential oils that have an earthy, tonic ability to calm skin irritations and blemishes. Its green, spicy aroma has a reputation in aromatherapy to uplift and ease anxiety and tension. Use this basil water to heal skin blemishes and ease irritation after shaving.

Basil Tonic Water
Bring 1 cup of water to a boil in a glass sauce pan. Remove the pan from heat and add a handful (at least 3 to 5 leaves) of fresh basil. Cover and allow to steep for 20 minutes. Discard the basil leaves from the water by filtering through cheesecloth.
To Use: Saturate a cotton ball with the basil water and wipe over face and neck. Gently pat dry.

Take a look in the book! On…

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Get Dirty

Nature as an artist

moss wall

Plant graffiti in Seattle


linden at UGCThe fumes of hundreds of buses and cars fill the hazy air. The fine, sandy grit of the asphalt breaking away with every passing tire, swirls around the ground. Along the front of my studio we extend an invitation to nature by planting a mix of plants in carved out spaces of the concrete sidewalk. Daily it is a hum of bees, hummingbirds and birds flitting in an out. On our gritty urban street in downtown Tacoma, nature just happens.

There are also Linden trees (Tilia) planted in holes along the curb with their base encased by a heavy metal grate. The Lindens are there to perform as their nondescript name of “street trees.” Most would only know them by the shade they cast over a car on a hot summer day. Taking time, over the past weeks to look closer, the trees are shimmering with the sticky goo of aphids. Most of the leaves are a glossed over mess as the debris of the urban street sticks to them.
But something happens this time of year as it always does-the ladybugs come to the rescue.
Right now the two trees are filled with ladybugs in all stages of life, from the sweet little speckled girls to the odd-looking larvae. The lindens have attracted a feast for them. Ladybugs (and their young) are voracious eaters of aphids and will lay their eggs where aphids are abundant so that the hatching larvae will have a good source of food. This is all a real sense of how nature is when allowed to just do and be the amazing nurturer of itself. The disruption is more our human touch applying chemicals and concoctions to stop what we don’t want to see, in this case the sticky aphid remnants. But in our little corner of the world, in unforgiving conditions not known to be a garden, we don’t intervene-we invite. Sometimes, it just takes patience to  let nature intercede.


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